Of The Products With Lots of 5-Star Ratings On Amazon, These 36 Are The Best

When it comes to shopping online, it helps to look at the most popular, highly-rated products on whichever site you’re browsing through. However, Amazon has thousands of popular products — so it can be tough to know which five-star Amazon selections are actually the best. Luckily for you, that’s where I come in. Below, you’ll find dozens of five-star-rated products that are, quite simply, so good at what they do. They’re so great, in fact, that I wouldn’t blame you for wanting to buy every last item in this collection. From cult-favorite travel mugs to soothing essential oil diffusers that double as mood-boosting lamps, Amazon has tons of items that are worth adding to your cart. If you find yourself having trouble choosing which products to buy on this list, you can always narrow it down to those that offer Amazon Prime shipping. That way, you won’t have to wait for days anticipating your purchases. Instead, you can start enjoying your new items in as little as 24 hours. You’ve got to love the internet, huh? I mean, hey, I do — and chances are high that you’ll love it even more after seeing this curation of stellar Amazon finds. T...

Brands Innovate, Create, Move Towards Sustainable Fashion

The fashion industry found a way to rapidly mass-produce the latest trends and sell for cheaper than ever before. And as a result, people were able to buy more and more clothing. Today, we have five times the amount of clothing that our grandparents had.  At first glance, this might seem great. But, fast fashion has come with a heavy environmental toll.  The average family in the Western world now throws away more than 60 pounds of clothing each year, much of which can take 200 years to decompose. And the production and transportation of clothing is now to blame for 10 percent of all global carbon emissions.  To make one traditional cotton t-shirt, it requires the same amount of water that one person drinks in two-and-a-half years, according to the World Resources Institute (WRI). And to dye fabric, the fashion industry currently uses enough water to fill 2 million Olympic-sized swimming pools each year.  Common polyester fabrics shed plastic microfibers that, through washing machines, end up in drinking water and ocean food chains. And other fabrics, including rayon and kapok, are wood-based and contribute to deforestation.  But, amidst the darkness, there are some brands that...