Truth: all that glitters is not gold. That luminous sparkle and shimmer could be a perfect-cut diamond, pure sterling silver, or a color-soaked gemstone. Fine jewelry and Valentine’s Day go together like a lonely Lacy Chabert character and the wholesome Ken-doll leads of the Hallmark Channel.  For centuries, diamonds have spoken the language of love. That dialect can take the form of a marquise, circle, pear, oval, or emerald-cut.  Like jewel-encrusted crowns, gold chalices, the Hope Diamond and Cleopatra’s amulets, all things bejeweled have also spoken of power, tradition, faith, and culture. A major jewelry theft in November, 2019, in Dresden, Germany, where the diabolical heist masterminds managed to haul off an estimated $1 billion in royal jewels, was lamented not only for the loss of irreplaceable heirlooms, but of that nation’s innate culture. Although many Americans assume engagement rings became a “thing” thanks to a shrewd advertiser targeting love-struck women and men eager to please them, the first well-documented use of a diamond ring to signal an engagement took root more than 500 years ago, by the Archduke Maximilian of Austria in the imperial court of Vienna.  In...