Increasing consumer demand for fresh foods has led to the development of processing and preservation methods

Increasing consumer demand for fresh foods has led to the development of processing and preservation methods that have minimal impact on either the nutritional or sensory properties of foods. Freshly prepared foods often contain less salt, acid, sugar, additives and preservatives. Since the use of mild preservation technologies primarily results in pasteurized products, hygienic processing equipment and a hygienic process environment are needed to prevent microbial, chemical and physical contaminants from affecting these products while preventing product exposure to sources of filth (pests, dust, etc.). Combating product contamination may occur not only at the equipment level but also at the factory level. Incorporation of hygienic design into your food processing facility can prevent development of pests and microbiological niches; avoid product contamination with chemicals (e.g., cleaning agents, lubricants, peeling paint, etc.) and particles (e.g., glass, dust, iron, etc.); facilitate cleaning and sanitation and preserve hygienic conditions both during and after maintenance. The facility infrastructure can be so designed and constructed that it cannot contaminate food product...

Before dismantling the old toilet, turn off the water at the mains by locating the stopcock

Before dismantling the old toilet, turn off the water at the mains by locating the stopcock and turning it clockwise. Use a cup, sponge or towel to remove as much water as possible from the toilet bowl and cistern. Have a bucket to hand to collect the water. Remove the screws from the base of the toilet and from inside the cistern if it is attached to the wall. Gently detach the old toilet from the waste pipe. You can push a cloth into the pipe to help stop smelly gases from spreading. Assemble and fit the flush mechanism and inner parts of the cistern. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and don’t over-tighten any fixings. Attach the close-couple washer to the top of the pan. Then, carefully lift the cistern into position, making sure that the flush mechanism thread fits into the washer and that the bolts sit comfortably through the holes in the pan. Align the waste pipe to the pan connector and attach, making sure the pan goes right into the connector collar. Use a spirit level to check that the cistern is level. If your cistern has fixing holes in the back, mark the position of the fixing holes onto the wall with a pencil. Use a pencil to mark the outline of the toilet pa...